Staff recommendations

Kingfisher

" Why I love it...

The beauty and iridescence of these birds, along with the natural display and the sun-set watercolour background, all come together to make it a quintessential Victorian ‘gentleman collectors’ piece.

Rob Douglas, Natural History Collections Assistant

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Mole skeleton

" Why I love it...

The Mole skeleton to me is novel, because I have seldom seen a living mole. The shovel-like hand bones and thick radius and ulna are also a great display of its adaptation for life underground.

Rob Douglas, Natural History Collections Assistant

"

Kiwis

" Why I love it...

I like the Kiwi specimens because they are such a great curiosity: the only bird with external nostrils at the tip of its beak and the largest egg to body ratio of any bird.

Rob Douglas, Natural History Collections Assistant

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Organ pipe coral

" Why I love it...

I really enjoy how this coral lives up to its name! I think the appearance of the coral skeletons many pipes and tubes in the bold red colour are great.

Rob Douglas, Natural History Collections Assistant

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Core sample

" Why I love it...

This core sample inscribed ‘OIL BORE, PAULSGROVE, ¼ mile DOWN’ tells a story – where the sample was taken and when (1936) which is inscribed on the reverse.

Christine Taylor, Curator of Natural History

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Water rail

" Why I love it...

I have an interest in historic taxidermy and was very pleased to see an example of work by Francis Arlett who was at Commerical Road, Landport, Portsmouth between 1878 and 1889.

Christine Taylor, Curator of Natural History

"

Decorated penguin eggs

" Why I love it...

These Gentoo Penguin eggs were collected on the Falkland Islands between 1931 and 1933. My favourite animals are penguins and I especially like the egg illustrated with a Chinstrap Penguin with an Adelie Penguin in the background.

Christine Taylor, Curator of Natural History

"

Moa bone

" Why I love it...

Giant Moas were the tallest birds that have ever lived. They lived in New Zealand and became extinct in the 15th century, less than 200 years after humans first arrived in the country.

Please note, the Moa bone is now at Portsmouth Museum and Art Gallery, as part of the D is for Dodo, E is for Extinct exhibition.

Christine Taylor, Curator of Natural History

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